Tuesday, February 28, 2017

As a lover of television series, I' afraid I must admit thatI've never watched Game Of Thrones but I have always admired the adaptation that screenwriters have delivered on HBO. With an insane budget of six million dollars an episode, George R.R. Martin's work has been one of the most watch television series thanks to the work of the team that is the show runners. During an interview that I observed, I noticed how David Benioff and D.B. Weiss recounted  their experience of starting off the first season of the show as main showrunners that had to gain the permission of Martin himself to even attempt to bring his work. I found it interesting that after talking for five hours with Martin, he simply asked them about a major detail  from  the book that only true fan of the material could only speculate.
After making an educated guess, they received Martin's approval to do the show.
The fact that both writers were  major players of Dungeons and Dragons game growing up and even shared this same hobby with George R.R. Martin seems to have been a factor in the collaboration. Perhaps Martin felt someone with detailed knowledge of his work and shared in fascination with that genre of storytelling would be perfect to adapted his books.  I think that a television series is a perfect medium to adapt novels instead of films because of the room that leaves showrunners to work in more precise details on camera.

My experience in collaboration  between other writers is always a good idea. I can understand the writers of the Game of Thrones series contempt with working separately and bringing their work together. During the interview, it was discussed that working on lines was something that was exchanged between showrunners on via email to expand the story.
It never occurred to me that showrunners working with HBO had a time frame of fifty minutes to complete and required addition production if that isn't met.

 The fact that the pilot was redone after the initial viewing shows how difficult it is to work on a production schedule for all involved in the creation process of the episode. A single flight delay or a weather issue could damage the set, causing creators to worry about making the episode work.
As a writer for short film, this is all too familiar to me, as constant issues involving budget and constant rescheduling of fellow co-writers.

In conclusion, I found that even though I've never been a die-hard fan of the series, I can truly relate to the writers dealing with average issues that others face throughout the industry. To get the approval from the original writer of the novels really  inspires me to work harder on my own material.

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